Academic Honesty in Question

Cheating? Really? Are you positive?

Cheating is sometimes a hard call and other times it is not even questionable.

Here’s my story:

One day I decided once to give my students extra time on an exam the next day because I had made it too long .  I was trying to be nice but maybe not one of my wisest decisions.  Looking back, it changed the way I wrote tests and administered them in the future – but I’m getting ahead of myself.

Someone took a copy of the test when he/she left class and shared it with friends. It was very evident that this had happened and a couple of students came to see me when they found out this out. It was also obvious that not all students saw it but most of them knew about it.  I couldn’t eat or sleep while I was trying to figure out what to do.  (Now students don’t even have to take the physical test if they can get pictures with their mobile devices.)  I gathered my facts and took them to the principal.  I laid out my plan, got his input, and made sure I had his support for what I was going to do. (Don’t forget to do this if you get in this situation! )  Next, I sent a letter home to parents, wrote another exam, and required all students to take it over since I couldn’t tell for sure who all were involved. It wasn’t a popular decision with all students or parents, but in my opinion, it was the most fair thing to do. The funny thing is, that some of the students I know were involved  had the parents who were most outraged that their child had to take the test over.  My whole body was a mess for a long time after and the relationship that I had with that class was back to the “prove to me you’re worthy of my trust.”   BTW, did I mention it was an AP Calculus class with potential valedictorians in the class, and that it was when I had a student teacher?

To make things worse

Now there are all sorts of other complications.

from http://kythana.deviantart.com/art/Cheat-sheet-nails-267741507 (check out the conversation on this page if you need more to think about!)

from http://kythana.deviantart.com/art/Cheat-sheet-nails-267741507 (check out the conversation on this page if you need more to think about!)

Here are some articles to check out and maybe help you think this through.  Warning: Don’t expect that all of your questions will be answered.

  1. Digital Tools Raise Questions about what is and what is not cheating by Katie Ash (August 21, 2013) –http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2013/08/students_need_more_guidance_on.html
  2. Read the stats about Harvard’s freshmen in the class of 2017 By  (Posted Thursday, Sept. 5, 2013 ) http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2013/09/05/harvard_cheaters_crimson_survey_finds_lots_of_cheating.html
  3. Moving from Cheating to Academic Honesty By Eugene Bratek – http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2012/10/17/08bratek.h32.html
  4. Cheating Runs Rampant:  No Child Left Behind has unleashed a nationwide epidemic of cheating. Will education reformers wake up?  by Daniel Denvir ( May 25, 2012) – http://www.salon.com/2012/05/25/cheating_runs_rampant/

What would you do if you saw or suspect students of cheating? 

Advertisements

About napmath

I recently retired from full-time teaching. I taught students in High School math classes from Basic Math through AP Calculus. I have been into integrating technology into my classes since 1981. I am Nationally Board Certified, am the proud recipient of a Presidential Award of Excellence in Math Teaching, text book author, Golden Apple Scholar, Certified SMART Board Trainer, Regional Technology Teacher of the Year, and give workshops across the country - geometry, Common Core, mathematics, Interactive Whiteboards, and technology. I am currently working as an adjunct faculty member at Illinois Wesleyan University and authoring books for SMART Boards and Promethean Boards with Vision Technology. http://visionstechnology.com/
This entry was posted in Calculus, Common Core, Math Education, Technology and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Academic Honesty in Question

  1. Well, that’s lousy. I had one problem–much smaller than yours–with cheating and was miserable about it for weeks. Between parents and admin–yuck. Lucky for me, as a tech teacher, most of my grading is on problem solving, using skills learned in prior classes, following directions, that sort. Squishy, though I quantify them as much as possible to avoid parental/student unrest.

    It sounds like it worked itself out. Good to hear.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s